Thoracic Imaging

Drs. Müller, Mayo, and Coxson head up the Thoracic Imaging Group, which collaborates with the Divisions of Respiratory Medicine and Thoracic Surgery at the Vancouver General Hospital and St. Paul’s Hospital. The Thoracic Imaging group has been involved in the development of quantitative lung imaging tools since 1985.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Drs. Coxson and Müller are the Core imaging facility for ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints) which is following over 2500 subjects for three years. Dr Coxson has received a Parker B. Francis Fellowship in Pulmonary Research and a BC Lung Association – Canadian Institutes of Health Research New Investigator Award. Two computer applications (EmphylxJ, Dicomnamer) have been developed to promote this research and have been posted on the University Industry Liaison Office Website (ubc.flintbox.com).

Lung Cancer Imaging

Dr. Mayo is the lead imaging investigator on a National Cancer Institute funded grant (Dr Stephen Lam – BC Cancer Agency – Principle investigator). This study involves the longitudinal follow-up of over 1000 patients where small lung nodules have been detected. Dr Mayo is also a co-investigator on a grant to develop and study the efficacy of technique to label these small lesions for safe surgical removal. Dr Mayo also has received industry sponsored funding to develop and validate lung nodule detection software.

Pulmonary Embolism

Dr. Mayo has had grants to study the imaging of pulmonary emboli. As such these studies have lead to the virtual elimination of pulmonary angiography as diagnostic technique for pulmonary emboli. Dr Mayo continues to work on new imaging techniques for the diagnosis of this condition.

Interstitial Lung Disease

Dr. Müller has published a large number of manuscripts in imaging of interstitial lung diseases with focus on correlation with histologic findings, functional abnormalities, progression over time, and differential diagnosis. Many of these studies were collaborative multicenter studies with academic institutions in Europe, Asia, North America, and South America.